Product Spotlight: Duratec High Gloss Additive

123754-lrgAt Fiberglass Coatings, we have all the tools, materials and knowledge to help you with your job, whether it being a large commercial job, or just doing a project around the house. With that in mind, we are spotlighting a product we have had around for a long time, but not everyone knows about; Duratec High Gloss Additive.

This gelcoat additive is useful for several different reasons. The first is that adding this as a 50/50 mixture will not only produce a high-gloss, paint-like finish, but it will also thin the gelcoat without adding a yellow tint, like Styrene can do. This is why we recommend this product for thinning while spraying. When adding this additive, you do not need to add Sanding Aid, as this would be the final coat. The only difference is that you will want to wait a full 24 hours before buffing to ensure the gelcoat has fully cured.

Another benefit of this product is eliminating porosity in tooling gelcoat. When you add this product as a 25% mixture, not only will it add an extra gloss to your tooling gelcoat, it will eliminate the porous surface by over 20 percent, allowing the surface to be waxed easier, and your part to pulled with less effort.

Check out the Tech Data Sheet HERE.

If you have any questions, be sure to contact us and we will be happy to help!

We are delivering to the Bay Area Daily!

100_2082At Fiberglass Coatings, we try to provide the best products at the best price, along with the best knowledge for all your fiberglass and resin projects. Now, we are making it even easier with several spots in the state of Florida having daily deliveries, so it’s even quicker and easier to get the products you need when you need them!

Are you in the Tampa Bay area? What about the Miami area? If you are, you can get our products delivered to you daily! You need to make sure you place your order by 3pm the day before and you will be all set! There is only a $10 handling charge, which makes getting our products cheaper and easier than ever!

If you have any questions or want to find out if you are eligible for daily deliveries, give us a call at 1-800-272-7890 today!

FGCI Fiberglass Clearance Special

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We have some fiberglass we are clearing out and we are cutting prices big time! Now is your chance to save big on select rolls of Fiberglass! Be sure to contact your sales rep for pricing, but do it quick, because these rolls won’t last long!

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XM2415 50″ FGCI +/- 45 – (125665) A great heavy-Duty glass on sale! 

 

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SM1815 – 50″ FGI – (125683) – A Stitchmat glass on sale! 

 

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Woven Roving – 18oz 50″ FGI (125818) – A medium weight Woven Roving On Sale!

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CM1603 50″ FGI Biaxial 0/90 (136752) – A medium weight Biaxial Material on Sale! 

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Triaxle SXTW3400 50″ FGI (137882) – A thick Triaxial material on Sale!

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XM2408 12″ +/-45 (125660) – A 12″ wide roll of 2408 on Sale!

 

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XM1708 12″ Double Bias +/-45 – 12″ Wide (125652) Roll of 1708 on Sale!

 

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CM3610 60″ Biaxial FCI 0/90 (137473) – 1 roll of 3610, 60″ on Sale! 

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TXSW 3408 6″ (125778) Triax material 6″ wide on Sale!

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SX2408 8″ (125778) A Biaxial material 8″ wide on Sale!

sale24oz 51″ OCV FCI 5×2 (139867) – 24 oz Woven Roving – Heavy Duty Fiberglass – On Sale!

 

 

How to Apply Gelcoat – The End-all Guide

Gelcoat PhotoProperly applying gelcoat is the key to a good finish. Many of our customers are hesitant to use it, thinking it’s too complicated or they think they can’t end up with a good finish. So, we are here to provide a step-by-step guide on how to properly apply gelcoat. As with all our products, if you have any questions, we are here to help!

First thing you want to do is look at the surface you want to apply gelcoat to. If the surface is already covered with gelcoat, or if the surface is a fiberglass, or polyester resin, then applying gelcoat will be a snap. If the surface is paint, then the paint would have to be removed before applying the gelcoat.

gelcoat-sandingSo, you’ve decided the surface is gelcoat, so it’s time to begin. You want to sand the surface to create a mechanical bond with the gelcoat. Start by sanding the surface with 150 grit or lower sandpaper. Our technicians recommend using Dyekum Steel Blue to be very thorough. Steel Blue is a dye you wipe on. Once you don’t see the blue dye anymore, you know you have properly sanded everything. You can also use a pencil, but it’s harder to see and won’t guarantee complete coverage.

Next, you want to clean the surface. We recommend using Acetone, as it doesn’t leave a residue and evaporates quickly. Once the surface is clean, you want to get going pretty quickly; if the surface sits for any extended amount of time, you will want to re-clean the surface. Dust and dirt particles are your enemy here, so be thorough on the cleaning.

We are ready to gelcoat! First, decide if you need one or two coats of gelcoat. It will take a minimum of two coats of gelcoat if you are changing colors. If this is going over a patch, we recommend 2 coats at least, to get a nice, uniform surface. Otherwise, one coat will do.

Gelcoat needs to be applied relatively thin. We recommend 18 mils mil-gauge-2thick, to properly cure. 18 mils is approximately the thickness of a matchbook cover. If you aren’t sure how thick, pick up a mil gauge. It’s a quick, easy way to see the thickness of your gelcoat.

Gelcoat requires Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide or MEK-P to activate the hardening process. The amount is very small. We recommend 1-1/4% to 1-1/2% by volume, which means 13-15cc’s per quart. Darker colors require a bit more catalyst for the same reaction, so you can catalyze up to 2%. Refer to the catalyst chart on the side of the can, or you can find one HERE.

Be sure to have a plan of attack for applying your gelcoat. Once you mix it, you have about 15 minutes to apply the gelcoat before it starts to get hard or “gel.” The actual working time depends on your amount of catalyst and how hot your working conditions are. Anything below 60 degrees, and your gelcoat will not cure, but as you get warmer and warmer, your working time decreases rapidly. At 70 degrees, you get your 15 minutes, but at 90 degrees, you only have about 5 minutes. If you need more working time, be sure to sit the can in some cool water, or even some ice to cool it down to 60 degrees give you a bit more time.

Brushable gelFor applying your gelcoat, you can either roll the gelcoat on, like paint, or you can spray it on. We also sell a Brushable Gelcoat that can be applied with a brush. If you decide to roll on the gelcoat, be sure to use a solvent-resistant 1/8” or ¼” nap. Be sure not to use foam rollers, as they tend to leave bubbles. If you brush it on, be sure to use a solvent resistant brush. Your first coat will simply consist of the gelcoat and the MEK-P catalyst. Once applied, you want to wait about an hour and a half, for the gelcoat to set. It won’t be completely cured by then, but it should be hard and tacky.

Your second coat will consist of the same amount of Catalyst, but if you are doing one more coat, your next coat will include Sanding Aid, or ‘wax.’ You will mix in 1 oz per quart to the gelcoat, which will seal the surface from oxygen, causing the gelcoat to dry tack-free. If you roll or brush your seconding coating, be sure to go the opposite direction from the previous coat, allowing a uniform coating.

If you are using our standard Exterior gelcoat, you will be ready to sand and buff your freshly gelcoated surface. If you are using our brushable gelcoat, you will want to let it sit overnight to ensure it’s completely cured. To start sanding, begin with 320 grit sandpaper and sand the surface completely. From then on, start going up to 400, then 600, and finally 800 grit sandpaper.

At this point, you can use an 800 grit compound to compound the gelcoat. You want to use a buffer that turns at 1600-3000 RPM’s. The car polishers will not work, as they spin too slowly, so you want to check the spin speed. It’s best to do a 4’ by 4’ area and go from there. Every 10’ or so, you will want to clean your pad with a spur or with some air to ensure pieces don’t scratch your surface.

If you want a beautiful, glossy shine, use a machine glaze and then two coats of wax, and you will have a beautiful finish that any professional would be envious of.

Tips on How to get Fiberglass out of You

hand washWe have all been there. At one point in our lives; we have touched or ground or moved fiberglass. Maybe it’s your job, maybe it’s a hobby, maybe you just accidentally brushed against it in our showroom. Whatever the case may be, we have all experienced the feeling. First the itching, then the splinter-like feeling and no matter how hard you scratch, it gets worse. That’s right, I’m talking about the dreaded fiberglass feeling. So, we went and asked some of our favorite experts how they get fiberglass out at the end of the day and we are posting some of the top tips. If you have one that’s not on here, please share it. Someone one day will thank you!

Tip #1 Baby Powder

Baby powder is good for many things. This product is great for rubbing on a fiberglassed area of your body and removing the agitation. The even better solution is to cover possibly exposed parts of your body with baby powder before you work. Our experts say it covers your pores and prevents glass from getting in. Given how often they work with raw fiberglass, they have to know what they are talking about.

Tip #2 Duct Tape

I know what you are thinking, and no, my name isn’t MacGyver. Duct Tape is useful for a lot of things. My dad always told me to take Duct Tape and fold it back on itself and gently pat the irritated area. The tape pulls out the fiberglass with each pat. While you may lose a bit of arm hair, you won’t have to deal with that irritation anymore, which is worth it.

Bonus Tip: Some people use a lint roller. In my experience, it doesn’t get the big stuff, but if you think it maybe hasn’t gotten in your skin yet, this may be a great way to get it off of you.

Tip #3 Cold Water

Closing the pores seems to be the key. Washing down with cold water is a popular option. Our experts say not to scrub, just simply wash down the infected area a few times, and the colder the water, the better. Several people have said they add a bit of dish soap, as well, to ensure the fibers slide out.

Tip # 4 Baby Oil 

This is another one where coating your skin with this stuff ahead of time can make all the difference, but even after it’s affected, baby oil can soothe the irritation.

Tip # 5 Epson Salt Hot Bath

I’ve heard good and bad from this one. This, to me, sounds like it would sting a bit from the infected area, but it could be a great way of letting the fiberglass fall out. Now, sitting in the tub with an adult beverage? Now we are talking!

Tip #6 Tweezers

This one is just plain no fun. It is very effective, especially if you have one or two big pieces. Using a flashlight and a magnifying glass will make it even easier, but in the end, you’re still tweezing your skin, which is annoying. I guess having fiberglass in your skin is more annoying.

Tip #7 Prevention is the key

We have mentioned on this blog several times the perks of wearing your PPE’s. Things like paper suits, and dust masks and eye protection can save a good amount of irritation and pain. So, the one step I know will work is covering up ahead of time.

 

So, if you have a solution that you didn’t see on here that you know works, or one of the solutions we listed you use, let us know in the comments!