A Glossary of 122 Industry Terms –

In the world of gelcoat and resin, like every industry, there are terms used that are considered common-place. We have an extensive glossary to help with those terms. Have some others you think we should add? Message us and let us know!

A

Accelerator – An additive to polyester resin that reacts with the catalyst to speed up polymerization. This is required in room temperature cured resins. See Promoter.

Acetone – In an FRP context, acetone is primarily useful as a cleaning solvent for removal of uncured resin from applicator equipment and clothing. Very flammable liquid.

Additive – Substance added to resin mix to impart special performance qualities, such as ultraviolet absorbers, flame retarding materials (antimony trioxide, chlorinated waxes).

Air-drying – To cure at room temperature with the addition of catalyst but without the assistance of heat and pressure.

Alligatoring – Wrinkling of the gelcoat film that resembles alligator hide.

B

Bag molding – A technique for forming and pressure-hardening plastics or plastics laminates by means of air pressure, vacuum and/or heat in a flexible or semi-flexible bag or autoclave, usually in connection with a rigid die or mold.

Barcol hardness – A determination of surface hardness of a polyester using a Barcol Impressor.

Benzoyl Peroxide (BPO) – The catalyst used in conjunction with aniline accelerators or where heat is used as an accelerator.

Bi-directional – An arrangement of the reinforcing fiber strands in which half the strands are laid at right angles to the other half, a directional pattern that gives the maximum product strength to those two directions.

Binder – A resin soluble adhesive that secures the random fibers in chopped strand mat or continuous strand roving.

Blister – A flaw or air pocket between layers of laminant or between the gelcoat film and the first layer of laminant.

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Norox MEK-P Catalyst Guide

catalystWe have talked about catalyst long and hard on this blog, a post you can read HERE. But now we are going to look a little more closely at the different Norox products offered in gallon size and up. There are some differences, which most people aren’t aware of, so, let’s highlight those differences here so you can be sure you are getting the perfect product for the job.

These products are offered in both red and clear. The red catalyst is preferred for resin applications so you can easily see if the resin and catalyst is properly mixed. The red color isn’t used for gelcoat as it will affect the color.

Norox MEK-P 9 – The standard catalyst for Noroc, the MEK-P 9 gives consistent room temperature performance with both resins and gelcoats. A reliable product of high purity assures quality in every system.

Norox MEK-P 925 – High dimer content gives excellent performance in most Vinylester resins. 925 also performs well when used with General Purpose and Isophtallic resins. This product is what is used for the 1 oz, 2 oz, 8 oz, pint and quart bottles. This is what is used when a customer wants “high-point 90.”

Norox MEK-P 9H – This product features a reduced level of hydrogen peroxide. 9H is particularly useful in critical gelcoat applications. Another application is in heated, continuous mixing systems for polymer concrete.

Noxox MEK-P 30 – A reduced strength version of the 9, the 30 provides the fabricator more accurate metering control in hot weather or with a highly reactive resin. This is a favorite during the hot summer months.

5 Tips for Using Vinylester Resin

Vinylester-Resin-Kit1. Vinylester Resin requires 2% MEK-P every time it is used in order to cure properly.
2. The maximum heat temperature is 220°F.
3. This product can be used to help gelcoat bond with epoxy.
4. The ideal temperature is at 77°F. Best results for this product can be obtained at temperatures between 70°F and 85°F, in a clean, dry, dust-free environment.
5. Do not go over 1/8” in thickness. More than 1/8” in thickness will generate too much heat.