Product Spotlight: Arjay 6011

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We have spent lots of time talking about coring material. Coring is a big part of the fiberglass industry and an essential component in boat making. However, not all coring comes in sheets. One of our many really interesting products is a putty by Arjay products called 6011 Ceramic Putty, and this product can save a lot of work!

The Pourable Ceramic Transom putty is sold in 5-gallon pails and is meant to be a liquid coring material that dries extremely hard and rigid; perfect for transoms or stringers in a boat. Why is that exciting you may wonder? Simple; if you are repairing a soft transom, which is when the wood gets wet and needs replacing; instead of completely replacing the transom, you can simply dig out the wood and pour this product in. Once the gap is filled, and the putty is cured, you are done! Often times, the transom is harder and stiffer than ever before!

So, let’s talk specifics. The exotherm on this putty is relatively low, which means that you can catalyze the entire pail and pour the full five gallons without worrying about combustion. Arjay recommends you catalyze at 1%, so an 8oz bottle of MEK-P Catalyst should do it. Gel time is about 18-20 minutes, so you have some working time with this product. Obviously, you can extend that time by cooling the product down ahead of time.

With large pours, Arjay recommends one single pour, so you want to get everything ready to go ahead time, so you can maximize your time. You CAN do multiple pours with this product. Ideally, you want to perform multiple pours before it cures, but even after it cures, you can add another pour, but it isn’t recommended on anything structural because it does create a bit of a seam.

One important bit of information I learned first hand is not to spill it. Once this stuff cures, it’s extremely hard. It’s a tough grind to get off a surface, so make sure you clean it before it cures.

We even have a Handy-Dandy estimator for how many pails you need. Download it HERE: Arjay6011Calculator

Spider Cracks: The Guide

Spider crack DYK

Spider Cracks are a thorn in many boaters side. They seem to appear out of nowhere, and for no reason. Fixing them can involve more than just slapping on some gelcoat, however, and that is where we come in!

The first step needs to be ensuring that your spider cracks are just that, and not a sign of a soggy core, or a broken support. If the underside looks solid, and the surface is steady, then a spider crack is just a spider crack.

For properly fixing a spider crack, you will want to open the cracks to properly fill them. Usually, the easiest way to do that is with a Dremel. Once you open the cracks to a good size, you can lightly sand the surface and wash it down with soap and water, or Acetone to get the surface clean.

From there, you will want some Gelcoat Putty. Gelcoat putty is sold in many sizes, and only requires you mix in a 1-1/2% ratio of MEK-P Catalyst. Once mixed properly, you can use a putty knife to work the putty in the cracks. Once dry, you will sand to a nice, smooth surface and you are ready for the last part.

Now that you have a nice, smooth surface, you probably notice your white patch is still, well, white. Now you want to apply some gelcoat over the top to cover your patch. We can match gelcoat to a sample you provide, or you can check out the stock colors we have. We even have a brushable gelcoat that just requires you to brush it on and be done.

So, there you have it! Your patch is done, and that pesky spider crack is gone, and your boat is good as new! If you have any questions, you can call our technicians or comment in the section below. We are here to help!

Product Spotlight: Kay-Cel

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We offer many types of Coring materials here at FGCI. Each material has different uses and benefits. Finding the right one for your project can be challenging. We are here to help! Today’s product spotlight is on a foam coring material called “Kay-Cel.”

Kay-Cel is a reinforced Closed-Cell Polyurethane foam panel. The surface has 18oz Woven Roving on top and has a density of 25 pounds. We sell the 4′ x 8′ sheets in everything from 1/2″ thickness to 2″ thickness.

The great part about Kay-Cel is the strength and the relative lack of weight. The sheet is 30% lighter than plywood, but unlike plywood, the sheets will not rot. That is extremely important for projects like transoms and stringers, where the product could be introduced to water. The foam uses a cross-linked polymer foam that allows the foam to not absorb water. As a result; it’s structurally sound, and great for use in marine applications.

You can check out our Kay-Cel selection on our website HERE. 

 

5 Tips for Using Brushable Gelcoat in the Summer

jorge-vasconez-642329-unsplashImagine sitting on a secluded beach with an ice cold beverage, listening to the waves crash on shore, and the birds chirping in the palm trees. Sounds relaxing? The summer months can be a perfect time for a vacation, but when working on a project, the heat can be a big problem. Here are some helpful tips on how to work with brushable gelcoat during the hot summer season.

  1. Cooling the gelcoat, by refrigerating the product to around 65 degrees, will give you up to 15 minutes of working time.
  2. Humidity can be another factor, so, make sure the mold and surrounding area is dry before applying your brushable gelcoa134054t.
  3. Make small batches of gelcoat at a time and catalyze at 1 ½ % to avoid the material from getting hotter. When spraying the gelcoat, make sure you catalyze at 2 %. If you choose to use Duratec, please note, the product must be cool as well.
  4. If you seek to roll on the gelcoat, the product should be applied evenly at 14 mil thick.
  5. Do not apply gelcoat in direct sunlight.